Aware connections dating

"When you lose faith that a car will do what you tell it to do," Miller observed at the time, "it really changes your whole view of how the thing works." Back then, however, their hacks had a comforting limitation: The attacker's PC had been wired into the vehicles' onboard diagnostic port, a feature that normally gives repair technicians access to information about the car's electronically controlled systems.A mere two years later, that carjacking has gone wireless.That rewritten firmware is capable of sending commands through the car's internal computer network, known as a CAN bus, to its physical components like the engine and wheels.Miller and Valasek say the attack on the entertainment system seems to work on any Chrysler vehicle with Uconnect from late 2013, all of 2014, and early 2015.

The researchers say they're working on perfecting their steering control—for now they can only hijack the wheel when the Jeep is in reverse.Their code is an automaker's nightmare: software that lets hackers send commands through the Jeep’s entertainment system to its dashboard functions, steering, brakes, and transmission, all from a laptop that may be across the country.To better simulate the experience of driving a vehicle while it's being hijacked by an invisible, virtual force, Miller and Valasek refused to tell me ahead of time what kinds of attacks they planned to launch from Miller's laptop in his house 10 miles west.Uconnect, an Internet-connected computer feature in hundreds of thousands of Fiat Chrysler cars, SUVs, and trucks, controls the vehicle's entertainment and navigation, enables phone calls, and even offers a Wi-Fi hot spot.And thanks to one vulnerable element, which Miller and Valasek won't identify until their Black Hat talk, Uconnect's cellular connection also lets anyone who knows the car's IP address gain access from anywhere in the country.

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